Rocky Mountains, USA and Index

David Beeson

We have been fortunate in having visited this area twice – once via Denver and again via Seattle. If you have the opportunity, go! The USA is easy to explore and booking hotels or AirB&B in advance is possible but not vital.

A few images to catch your imagination as the world may open up soon.

Marmot in Rocky Mountain NP
Near Glacier NP
Despite our being far from safety, this magnificent bison ignore us. Lamar Valley, Yellowstone. And, yes, we did have close view of wolves – magnificent and worth the journey alone.
Don’t go to Iceland or New Zealand – go here!
Heat tolerant microorganisms fringe the steaming pool – they have been critical in biological research and useful in industrial processes.
Falls in Yellowstone
Grand Teton NP is virtually attached to Yellowstone, yet quite different.
Lots of water snakes and pika here
We were walking way off the roadway when a couple came running towards us. “We are being chased by a moose!” was the cry. Indeed, we could spot one some 200m up the path, and we diverted up a rocky slope to clear the path. A short while after, the lone moose cautiously came down the path watching us with more concern than we had for it. The couple had just stumbled into its daily routine and the animal was after breakfast in the river valley.
Olympic NP
Calypso Orchid, Glacier NP

The articles published on the site are numerous – some 90. So, you may have missed one or two!! Perhaps you should see if any of these take your fancy.

INDEX: Oldest articles first – from late 2019.

  1. Harewood Forest – an introduction to an ancient UK oak woodland
  2. Along the river valley – the early stages of a crystal-clear chalk stream – River Anton, Hampshire
  3. Harewood Butterflies – high summer delights
  4. Bluebells – the iconic English spring bulb
  5. Heathland – acid lands north of Andover UK. Contrasting ecology.
  6. God’s Ponds – ancient man-made ponds
  7. Butterflies and chalk flora
  8. Holly leaf-miner – an unusual lifestyle
  9. Mammals
  10. Old Burgclere – an old chalk quarry, now a mini but rich nature reserve
  11. Snelsmore Common – acid heathlands with snakes, carnivorous plants and rare birds
  12. Stockbridge Down – chalk grassland butterflies and more
  13. Watermeadows – an ancient agricultural technique that still shows traces
  14. Watership Down – chalk hillside
  15. Longparish’s River – the amazing River Test
  16. Fungi
  17. Odonata 2 Mayflies and dragonflies
  18. Odonata 1
  19. February
  20. December
  21. Mammal mapping
  22. Good news
  23. March
  24. Lawns
  25. War! – Primroses v cowslips
  26. Botany and Geology
  27. You cannot see the wood for the trees – tree ecology
  28. Moss and plant life cycles. This article will surprise you.
  29. Dino-botany – horsetails
  30. March
  31. Today in the garden – ecogarden
  32. Of Dukes and Men – butterflies
  33. More creepy-crawlies
  34. Edge of the A303 – road verge botany
  35. Sidbury Hill 1 – Military ecology
  36. Was that a Sea Eagle?
  37. Being a male can be hard work – common blue butterfly
  38. Secret meadow – damselflies
  39. Like Southern England 200 Years Ago
  40. No Cut Lawn in May
  41. Edge of the A303, 2
  42. A Wet Meadow
  43. Damselfly Hunt
  44. Moths of Harewood
  45. Insects
  46. Harewood in Summer
  47. Wild Gladiolus
  48. Damsels
  49. Sampling and Recording Data
  50. River Test
  51. Ticks
  52. Grasses (Most Hated Wildflowers)
  53. I Poison Myself
  54. What do Insects Eat
  55. Children – water Ecology
  56. Ticks
  57. Nectar
  58. Eco-gardening
  59. Damsels and Dragons
  60. Plants are Clever, 1
  61. Early September
  62. An English Canal
  63. Dorset Heaths
  64. Re-introductions
  65. Dormice 1 (A Brilliant Day)
  66. Harewood Forest
  67. Dormice
  68. Oak Woodland in November
  69. Inside Plant Stems
  70. SE USA, Okefenokee Swamp
  71. Wildlife Encounters
  72. Photo Essay
  73. 1st January
  74. Hibernation (Feeling Sleepy)
  75. Inside Plant Roots
  76. Signs of Spring
  77. Natural Wold in Photographs 1, 2 and 3 (Damsels and Dragons)

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